Nicole Cheng

  • How Accountable is the Road Repair and Accountability Act (aka SB 1)?

    SB 1 workshops are starting up again beginning Tuesday, September 21, from 1:00 to 4:00 pm. Some partners in this network have long contributed to the advocacy around SB 1, and know the drill. Joining these workshops is vital for reinforcing and holding the California Transportation Commission (CTC) accountable to shifting transportation funding. Money needs to go to projects that reduce greenhouse gas emissions and address inequities in mobility as required by the Climate Action Plan for Transportation Infrastructure (CAPTI). 

    However, this year the workshops are less accessible, and it will be harder to ensure there are shifts in transportation funding. For this reason, the Road Repair and Accountability Act is not living up to its name. The CTC needs to create more ways for stakeholders to engage in the discussion. We are encouraging folks to advocate for this as well. 

    Read more

  • published Reports in Resources 2021-09-10 13:20:48 -0700

    Reports

    From ClimatePlan and partners

    Overarching Principles for Land-Use and Water Integration in the San Francisco Bay Area

    by ClimatePlan – August 2020

    Water is essential to planning for healthier, sustainable, and more equitable communities. Without water, no one can survive. Stronger and more equitable integration of water in the regional transportation plan will help address the San Francisco Bay Area’s current challenges around housing and water unaffordability, inequitable growth, limited water supply, and limited interagency coordination. This integration will also help the San Francisco Bay Area prepare for climate change. This research, and its recommendations, are focused on the San Francisco Bay Area's regional transportation plan, Plan Bay Area 2050. Download the report

    2020 ClimatePlan Listening Session Report

    by ClimatePlan – March 2020

    To achieve ClimatePlan's Strategic Priorities, it is essential that ClimatePlan’s network is connected and aligned. California is facing complex and immense challenges, ClimatePlan can help California address those challenges by bringing different communities together to develop integrated solutions. In 2020, ClimatePlan staff brought diverse organizations together to develop integrated solutions by hosting regional listening sessions. This report outlines the findings from ClimatePlan's 2020 Listening Sessions. Download the report

     

    Lead the Way, California: A Transportation Platform to Move Us Forward

    by ClimatePlan and partners – November 2018

    This transportation platform provides a vision for California to lead the way to invest and build transportation that connects everyone to a brighter future. This vision is achievable, and the platform outlines five actions the new administration must take to make the vision a reality: 1) Prioritize transportation that moves California forward; 2) Act to meet the greatest needs first; 3) Champion housing justice for California's communities; 4) Clean up California's air; 5) Recognize the true value of California's landscapes. Download the report

     

    More Choices, Less Traffic: Achieving Greater Efficiency and Equity from California’s Transportation Investments

    by Climate Resolve and ClimatePlan – June 2018

    More_Choices_Less_Traffic_cover.jpg

    This report describes how transportation investments and land use patterns have contributed to California's congestion woes, and suggests an alternative path forward, centered on reducing driving, or vehicle miles traveled (VMT). This path will reduce traffic, improve mobility, and reduce greenhouse gas emissions — with many more "co-benefits" for community health, equity, and opportunity. The report recommends an intersectional, cross-jurisdictional, equity-enhancing approach for the most potential to improve people's lives. Download the report

     

    Leading the Way: Policies and Practices for Sustainable Communities

    Leading-the-Way-Front-Cover.jpgby ClimatePlan – October 2016

    Leading the Way presents the best strategies yet—“leading practices”—that regions around the state have used for public engagement, funding, planning land-use scenarios, and more, as they create Sustainable Communities Strategies. In addition to existing best practices, the report offers ways to go further. It provides inspiration and solutions that advocates and planners can use in their own communities. Download the report

     

    Toward A Sustainable Future: Is Southern California On Track?
    by ClimatePlan and partners* – December 2015

    On-Track-Report-Cover.jpgThe On Track report assesses Southern California's progress in the three years since it adopted its first Sustainable Communities Strategy in 2012, produced while the region was preparing its second plan. How are cities, counties, and towns in the state's most populous region acting together to improve land use and transportation planning and reduce greenhouse gases? Download the report

    *Partners: The Safe Routes to School National Partnership; American Lung Association in California; California Walks; Climate Resolve; Friends of Harbors, Beaches and Parks; Investing in Place; Move LA; Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC); Prevention Institute; and TransForm.
     

    San Diego and SB 375: Lessons from California’s first Sustainable Communities Strategy
    By Eliot Rose, Autumn Bernstein, and Stuart Cohen 2011

    The San Diego Association of Governments (SANDAG) approved the first Sustainable Communities Strategy (SCS) under Senate Bill 375 in October 2011.  This report takes a comprehensive look at the plan and analyzes why it didn’t achieve the greenhouse gas emissions (GHG) reductions that many hoped it would. Download the report

    Additional reports from our partners

    Planning and Conservation League and Center for Neighborhood Technology, 2020

    In response to California’s deepening housing affordability crisis, through the course of 2019, the
    Planning and Conservation League (PCL) consulted and convened cross-interest experts with the aim of identifying an improved standard of criteria for equitable infill incentives in urban, suburban, and rural contexts, that could be used for a range of state and local policy applications.

    State-Level Strategies for Reducing Vehicle Miles Traveled
    University of California Institute of Transportation Studies, 2017

    Strong evidence exists that strategies across four categories – pricing, infill development, transportation investments, and travel demand management programs – can reduce vehicle miles of travel (VMT). This paper identifies state policies and programs that are implemented or being considered for each category of strategies, to help inform a framework for California.

    Health Impact Assessment: California’s SB 375 and Its Impact on Fresno County’s Disadvantaged Unincorporated Communities and Low Income Urban Neighborhoods
    Leadership Counsel for Justice and Accountability, 2017

    This Health Impact Assessment (HIA) focuses on potential impacts of SB 375 implementation in four Fresno County communities, analyzes transit access across different scenarios in the region's Sustainable Community Strategy, and makes recommendations for the Fresno Council of Governments.

    Greenbelt Alliance, 2017

    Greenbelt Alliance's most recent analysis of the San Francisco Bay Area's farms, ranches, and natural areas at risk of being lost to sprawl development, based on current plans and policies. Today, 293,100 acres of farms, ranches, and natural lands are at risk of development in the next 30 years; 63,500 acres are at risk in the next 10 years.

    Race, Inequality, and the Resegregation of the Bay Area
    Urban Habitat, 2016

    This policy brief maps the regional transformation currently underway in the Bay Area and its implications for low-income communities and communities of color. Low-income communities and communities of color are increasingly living at the expanding edges of the region, struggling to find good jobs, schools, and services; in the core, housing and other costs grow ever higher.

    Social Equity in Transportation Planning
    Richard Marcantonio and Alex Karner, 2016

    This paper critiques the framework currently used by metropolitan planning organizations (MPOs) to assess equity in long-range regional transportation plans, which treats those residents as bystanders, and does not actually make needed change. Instead, the authors propose asking first, "What are the most pressing unmet needs of particular underserved communities?"

    Seizing the Power of Public Participation
    Richard Marcantonio and Sam Tepperman Gelfant, 2016

    In this article, the authors contend that successful public engagement is rarely due to the initiative of public agencies, but instead
    relies on residents coming together powerfully to influence decisions that affect them. Based on recent campaigns, they recommend three strategies for success in using public participation requirements to build power and win concrete outcomes.

    Sustainable Communities and Conservation
    The Nature Conservancy, 2016

    This report surveys conservation measures in existing Sustainable Communities Strategies around the state, along with conservation-related proposals that were made but not adopted in each region. It offers a set of model policies and best practices for future SCSs, because conservation is an essential component of reducing greenhouse gas emissions.

    Planning for a Healthier Future
    Transportation for America, 2016

    This report summarizes current best practices in the development of health, equity and environmental measures that can be used to evaluate the performance of transportation investments at a regional scale.

    Key Strategies to Advance Equitable Growth in Regions
    PolicyLink, 2015

    This report draws from work in more than 40 cities and regions to connect low-income people and communities of color to the economic mainstream. It lifts up strategies concentrated in seven areas, all helping communities to plan for equitable growth, remove employment barriers, grow good jobs, and strengthen the education pipeline.

    Regional Planning for Health Equity
    PolicyLink, 2015

    This brief introduces strategies for planning for health equity at a regional scale, and summarizes the movement for building healthy communities. It draws from the experiences of regional equity coalitions and metropolitan planning organizations to identify five important conditions that must be met to achieve effective results.

    Disadvantaged Communities Teach Regional Planners a Lesson in Equitable and Sustainable Development
    Richard Marcantonio and Alex Karner, 2014

    This article describes how San Francisco Bay Area advocates for affordable housing, public transit, public health and other social equity outcomes came together as the 6 Wins Network and won the adoption of a more equitable regional plan, which they demonstrated was better for the climate as well as for low-income communities.

    A Regional Government Primer for Practitioners 
    Safe Routes to School National Partnership, 2013?

    The 2012 federal transportation act, Moving Ahead for Progress in the 21st Century (MAP-21), created new ways for Safe Routes to School programs to attract funding from metropolitan planning organizations (MPOs). This is a brief guide to understanding your MPO’s process and leveraging points can help you and your partners recognize new opportunities to fund walking and bicycling projects in your communities.

    Creating Healthy Regional Transportation Plans
    TransForm, 2012

    This guide reviews direct and indirect impacts of transportation on health, and how Sustainable Communities Strategies can improve health. It gives specific guidelines for Regional Transportation Plans on everything from bicycle/pedestrian improvements to promoting access for and participation by vulnerable communities, addresses challenges and roadblocks, and offers case studies of successful plans, projects and programs.

    A Bold Plan for Sustainable California Communities: Report on the Implementation of Senate Bill 375
    NRDC and Move LA, 2012

    Southern California, Sacramento, and San Diego were the first three regions in America to adopt Sustainable Communities Strategies—transportation plans specifically designed to reduce their greenhouse gas emissions. This report tells the story of how these regions tackled implementation of SB 375, and their unique challenges and successes.

    Getting Involved in Transportation Planning: An Overview for Health Advocates
    By Public Health Law and Policy and TransForm, 2011

    This fact sheet discusses the important links between transportation planning and health, describes the key players and processes of local and regional transportation planning, and suggests steps to advocate effectively for healthier transportation policies.

    SB 375: An Opportunity to Design Healthy, Sustainable Communities
    ChangeLab Solutions, 2011

    Groundbreaking legislation in California—SB 375—offers the chance to integrate health priorities into long-term planning efforts. This fact sheet provides an overview of the law and ways for public health advocates to get involved in the planning process.

     

    Save

    Save

    Save

    Save

    Save

    Save

    Save

    Save

    Save

    Save

    Save

    Save

    Save

    Save

    Save

    Save

    Save

    Save

    Save

    Save

    Save

    Save

    Save

    Save

    Save

    Save

    Save

    Save

    Save

    Save

    Save

    Save

    Save

    Save

    Save

    Save

    Save

    Save

    Save

    Save

    Save

    Save

    Save

    Save

    Save

    Save

    Save

    Save

    Save

    Save

    Save

    Save

    Save

    Save

    Save

    Save

    Save

    Save

    Save

    Save


  • published Join ClimatePlan CAPTI workgroup in Blog 2021-09-03 13:29:31 -0700

    Join ClimatePlan CAPTI workgroup

    The California Transportation Commission has adopted the Climate Action Plan for Transportation Infrastructure (CAPTI), but there is more to be done. Building off the momentum that advocates (including ClimatePlan and our network) and agency staff created, ClimatePlan is announcing our workgroup! Read more below for background on CAPTI, its importance, and how to get involved. (spoiler alert: the registration link is here).

    Read more

  • published Fact Sheets and Platforms in Resources 2021-09-03 12:22:19 -0700

    Fact Sheets/ Platforms

    Fact Sheets

    CP_CAPTI_explainer_chart_cover.png

    CAPTI Explainer

    ClimatePlan developed this chart, which breaks down the Climate Action Plan for Transportation infrastructure (CAPTI framework). The chart is centered around transportation (and beyond) planning and funding. Download the chart.

     

     

    SB 1 Workshop talking pointsSB_1_Talking_points_cover.png

    This document compiles talking points for three SB 1 programs; the Trade Corridor Enhancement Account, Solutions for Congested Corridors, and Local Partnership Program. It is a living document. Please feel free to add comments or email Nicole if you want to add resources or points. Contribute to this document here.

     

    CP_Scoping_Plan_2022_cover.pngCalifornia Air Resources Board: 2022 Scoping Plan Update

    ClimatePlan developed a one-pager, which summarizes the 2022 Scoping Plan update process for the California Air Resource Board. It also highlights actions to take and why the 2022 Scoping Plan is important. Download the one-pager.

     

     

    CP_Transportation_spending_1_pager_cover.pngCalifornia's Climate Goals & Transportation Spending 

    ClimatePlan developed a fact sheet to show that despite California's ambitious climate goals, the state's transportation investments continue to prioritize roads and highways. This fact sheet shows that if California does not transform how it spends transportation funds, the state will not meet its climate goals. Download the fact sheet

     

     

    Platforms and Frameworks

    • Commitment to Investment without Displacement
      ClimatePlan worked with partner organizations to develop this policy platform, which includes a shared goal and nine principles to ensure investment without displacement. This platform builds upon expertise from partners across different issue areas such as housing, environment, social equity, transportation, and conservation to provide an cross-sector approach to address this complex issue. Download the platform

    • Mapping and Planning for Public Health
      The Public Health Alliance of Southern California is releasing the California Healthy Places Index to map cumulative health advantage. The index maps social determinants of health: economic, social, political, and environmental factors that influence people's physical and cognitive function, behavior, and disease. The data is from publicly available sources, at a census tract level. Freely available online, to help communities and public and private agencies help prioritize investments, resources, and programs. PowerPoint introduction

    • City and Regional Planning for Parks, Open Space, and Agriculture
      The Nature Conservancy, Trust for Public Land, and The Conservation Fund recently launched the Greenprint Resource Hub, a first-of-its-kind database for practitioners, policymakers, and community members looking to incorporate parks, open space, and agriculture into their economic and social goals. The database includes detailed case studies of how cities and surrounding regions have incorporated nature into city and regional planning, informing their decisions about how to grow and where to protect land to secure habitat, water, recreation, and food production.

    • 2016 RTP Platform: Advancing Sustainable Equitable Regional Planning
      ClimatePlan worked with Public Advocates, Safe Routes to School National Partnership, and California Pan-Ethnic Health Network to develop this policy platform, which includes ten detailed recommendations for the Regional Transportation Plan Guidelines in 2016. This policy platform is a great resource for any group working on an RTP update.
      Download the platform
    • Social Equity Policies for SB 375 Targets
      From 2010 - 2012, ClimatePlan partnered with Public Advocates and others to promote a socially equitable approach to SB 375 targets. This approach would analyze the potential beneficial and harmful impacts of targets and SCSs on lower income Californians and communities of color specifically, and select alternatives that maximize both GHG reduction and positive equity impacts while avoiding or offsetting any negative impacts.
      Download recommendations 
    • SB 375 Health & Equity Metrics  
      This brief summary by Human Impact Partners, created in 2011, provides Metropolitan Planning Organizations (MPOs) with a set of metrics to promote health and equity as well as sustainability. For example, a plan selected using the indicator “Automobile Level of Service (LOS) on Roadways,” will prioritize making driving easier, despite the many ways driving harms health; instead, using “Premature Death due to Traffic­-Related Pollution” will be more likely to reduce pollution by promoting alternate forms of transportation. Download 2-page summary

  • Webinar Recap: Using Collaborative Planning to Address Compounding Crises

    ClimatePlan’s CivicSpark fellow, Nicole Cheng, recently facilitated a webinar discussion entitled “Using Collaborative Planning to Address Compounding Crises.” Over the past year, Nicole has been working on ways for planning departments throughout the Bay Area to better integrate land use and water supply planning. Over the year of research and engagement, it has become clear that climate change and the pandemic have amplified existing challenges around integrating water and land use in planning. But, there are also opportunities for transformational change in the way that agencies, advocates, and communities can work together to create more resilient, equitable communities throughout the state. 

    The webinar had a great lineup of panelists, including Thomas Niesar - Water Supply and Planning Manager at Alameda County Water District (ACWD), Zoe Siegel - Director of Climate Resilience at Greenbelt Alliance, and Clarrissa Cabansagan - Director of Programs at TransForm. 

    You can listen to the full webinar here

    Here is an outline of the webinar and time stamps associated with it. 

    • Panelist introductions: 5:00-7:18
    • Summary of the challenges: 8:06-32:17
    • Barriers to collaboration/opportunities: 32:17 - 47:37
    • Audience Q and A: 47:37- 1:02:36
    Read more

  • 1 Year Into the Pandemic - How We Can Use Collaborative Planning to Get out of Compounding Crises

    Right now, we are one year into a global pandemic and stay-at-home orders. The data from the State Water Board is showing 1.5 million Californians are behind on their water bills; the average amount of debt per household is $500. According to the Legislative Analyst office, Californian renters owe $400 million in unpaid debt, on top of a shortfall of 220,000 of affordable homes (MTC and ABAG). Latinx, Black, and Asian households are more likely to be behind on rent and water bills than white households. A decline in ridership has led to a decrease in public investments in transportation infrastructure, which is largely used by low income communities. 

    This is just the tip of the iceberg. These multiple, compounding crises further highlight the importance of collaborative infrastructure planning for healthy and sustainable communities. Current financing infrastructure relies on local governments, water agencies, and transportation agencies to fund their own operation, maintenance, and infrastructure upgrades. Local governments can rely on impact fees. However, many transportation and water agencies have few outside sources of revenue. So, they largely rely on funding from their constituents and customers in paying their utility bills, paying ridership fees, etc. 

    Read more

  • Onward with Implementation: How we’re integrating water, land-use and equity in the San Francisco Bay Area

    In August 2020, ClimatePlan released a new report -  Overarching Principles to Better Integrate Water and Land-use in the San Francisco Bay Area. [Thank you again to the water agencies, non-profits, and our partners at MTC (Metropolitan Transportation Commission), San Francisco Estuary partnership, and Local Government Commission for your wisdom and expertise].  Since the release of the report, we have been moving forward with implementing the principles laid out in the report. I have been working with MTC and ACWD (Alameda County Water District) to refine the implementation plan of Plan Bay Area 2050--the Bay Area’s regional transportation plan-- and have been developing a policy-framework to provide local guidance to implementing the strategies.  I have also been assessing collaboratives and key partnerships within the Bay Area to find spaces to develop this policy-framework.  

    The Issues at Hand: New Report Summary and Centering New Context

    Our new report highlights how water affordability, housing affordability, vulnerability to climate change, and transportation challenges intersect. 

    Housing unaffordability is exacerbated by the challenges of high transportation costs and water costs. This is because both add an additional burden for low income households, and Black and Latinx communities. These communities have been underinvested in because of the legacy of redlining, disinvestment, and systemic racism. It is well known that the current COVID-19 pandemic has highlighted how many of these communities are not able to comfortably meet basic needs of housing and water. The pandemic has also exacerbated water and housing affordability challenges, by bringing on debt: marginalized and low income residents are now unsure of how much money they owe from their suspended rent and water bills.

    Moreover, these communities are more likely to be the most vulnerable to climate change because they are under-resourced. Preparing for climate change will require infrastructure upgrades to account for flooding and droughts, a financial burden that would mostly fall on residents at this moment. MTC, ABAG, and ACWD recognize these problems, and are taking vital steps towards better integrating water into land-use planning.

    Read more

connect

get updates

Liquid syntax error: Error in tag 'subpage' - No such page slug site.signup_page